Last edited by Zuzil
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

3 edition of Catha edulis (miraa) found in the catalog.

Catha edulis (miraa)

Charles Karimi Maitai

Catha edulis (miraa)

a detailed review focusing on its chemistry, health implication, economic, legal, social, cultural, religious, moral aspects, and its cultivation.

by Charles Karimi Maitai

  • 377 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Republic of Kenya, National Council for Science and Technology in [Nairobi] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Qat

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesNCST ;, no. 40, NCST (Series) ;, no. 40.
    ContributionsNational Council for Science and Technology (Kenya)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSB295.Q38 M35 1996
    The Physical Object
    Paginationii, 52 p. :
    Number of Pages52
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL144975M
    LC Control Number99890362

      Growing Catha edulis Ghat, Khat, Qat Natural Growing Conditions Khat is a large, slow growing, evergreen shrub, reaching a height of between 1 and 5 metres, in equatorial regions it may reach a height of 10 metres. It is native to East Africa and Arabia, but is now cultivated in many countries throughout Africa. Catha Edulis is a psychoactive plant found in East Africa and Western Arabia. Depending on who you ask, Khat may be considered a deadly drug or a cultural tradition. This book goes into detail on the psychoactive effects whether Instantaneous, Long Term Usage, or Indeterminate.

    Catha spp. Khat View More Information. Displaying 1 to 6 (of 6 products) Result Pages: 1 Catha edulis f. green (Khat) Plant [NO EXPORT!] Bulk amount of Red form of Catha edulis. Seeds can be exported. This variety orig AU$ 2 Currently In Stock. Catha edulis f. red (Khat) Plant [NO EXPORT!] NO EXPORT! Red form of Catha edulis.   khat (countable and uncountable, plural khats) A shrub, Catha edulis, whose leaves are used as a mild stimulant when chewed or brewed as tea; also a drug produced from this plant. , Lawrence Durrell, Monsieur, Faber & Faber , p. Of course he was an amateur of quat – hashish – which delighted the cops.

    Catha edulis Forssk. ex Endl. Khat is a flowering plant native to tropical East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. It is also known as qat, qaat, quat, gat, jaad, chat, chad, chaad and miraa. The plant is grown commercially in Kenya, Oman, Yemen and Ethiopia. Khat is a shrub. When grown commercially, the shrubs grow to a size of about 5m, in the. crude Catha edulis may not be due to any one or all three of these fractions. There are probably other active agents. For the most up-to-date review of the pharmacology, vide that wonderful book by Watt and Breyer-Brandwijk (22) and for detailed pharmacol-ogy refer also to Paris and Moyse (14), Peters (15), and Winterfeld and Bernsmann (23). It.


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Catha edulis (miraa) by Charles Karimi Maitai Download PDF EPUB FB2

Catha edulis. Bushman's Tea (E) Boesmanstee (A) Mohlatse (NS) umHlwazi (Z) Native to Southern Africa Tree Tree no.: Evergreen Full sun Frost tolerant Medium water requirements Fast grower Attracts birds Attracts insects.

FLOWER COLOUR: AVERAGE SIZE (H) x (W): 20m x 4m. Khat is a flowering evergreen shrub native to East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The plant (Catha edulis) contains two alkaloids, cathinone and cathine, Immigrants spread khat : Marc Lallanilla.

Catha edulis (khat) is a plant grown commonly in the horn of Africa. The leaves of khat are chewed by the people for its stimulant action. Its young buds and tender leaves are chewed to attain a state of euphoria and stimulation. Khat is an evergreen shrub, which is cultivated as a bush or small tree.

The leaves have an aromatic odor. Alsalahi A, Alshawsh MA, Mohamed R, et al. Conflicting reports on the role of the glycemic effect of Catha edulis (Khat): A systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Ethnopharmacol. ; Khat is a stimulant made up of fresh leaves of the Catha edulis shrub found in East Africa and southern Arabia.

It contains a variety of chemicals. Abstract. The khat plant (Catha edulis) is produced in certain areas of East Africa and the Arabian peninsula, and the leaves are chewed for their stimulating effect.

Fresh material, which is preferred by users, contains a substance that is rapidly converted to (+)-norpseudoephedrine. As a consequence of the traditional means of consumption, intoxication with khat is self-limiting but chronic.

Catha edulis Forsk., its preparations, derivatives, alkaloids and salts, including: (1) Cathine (d–threo–2–amino–1–hydroxy–1–phenylpropane).

Flanman3116 September (UTC) While there are numerous spellings, and all of them are acceptable, there is always a preferred spelling. Catha Edulis is a psychoactive plant found in East Africa and Western Arabia.

Depending on who you ask, Khat may be considered a deadly drug or a cultural tradition. This book goes into detail on the psychoactive effects whether Instantaneous, Long Term Usage, or : $ Jeffrey K. Aronson, in Manson's Tropical Infectious Diseases (Twenty-third Edition), Khat.

Khat or qat (cafta, miraa, muiragi) is a stimulant commonly used in East Africa, Yemen, and southern Saudi Arabia and is derived from a small tree, Catha edulis. The leaves and twigs are chewed while fresh, but can also be smoked, infused in tea, or sprinkled on food. Catha edulis (khat, qat frae Arabic: القات ‎) is a flouerin plant native tae the Horn o Africae an the Arabian commonties frae these areas, khat chowin has a history as a social custom datin back thoosands o years.

References. Catha edulis will grow well in full sun or part shade. It’s ideal is 80 degrees (f) at about the ′ elevation in the tropics. This translates well to part shade, 80 degrees (f) at lower elevations. Generally, the more red on the stems and veins of the leaves, the stronger the Khat is considered to be.

Khat (catha edulis) is a psychoactive shrub whose tender leaves and twigs are chewed in the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula for their euphonizing effects for a millennium.

A stimulant grown in small gardens for consumption on cultural and religious occasions around the turn of the last century, khat has now become the preferred and Author: Ezekiel Gebissa. Simon Gibbons, Warunya Arunotayanun, in Novel Psychoactive Substances, Catha edulis (Khat).

Khat (Catha edulis Forsk. ex Endl.) is a small tree from the Celastraceae plant family that grows in East Africa and the Southern Arabian crude drug material has a number of names in various locations such as ‘qat’ (Yemen), ‘tchat’ (Ethiopia), ‘qaad or jaad’ (Somalia) or.

Catha forskalii. Catha inermis. Celastrus edulis Vahl. Dillonia abyssinica Sacleux. Methyscophyllum glaucum Eckl. & Zeyh. Trigonotheca serrata Hochst. Catha edulis cultivation and general info. «on: Novemam» I can't seem to find a lot of info. about catha edulis on the web, So I figured I would start a general info.

thread about the plant to pool our resources. Khat definition: a white-flowered evergreen shrub, Catha edulis, of Africa and Arabia, whose leaves have | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples. References: Bally, P.

Catha edulis.E. African Med. Chinese Academy of Sciences. Flora reipublicae popularis sinicae. Note: lists as Catha. Khat (Catha edulis) is a flowering shrub native to northeast Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Individuals chew khat leaves because of the stimulant effects, which are similar to but less intense than those caused by abusing cocaine or methamphet-amine.

When fresh, khat leaves are glossy and crimson-brown in color, resem-bling withered basil. Khat Khat is a shrub or small tree (Catha edulis) that grows in the higher regions of Yemen and East Africa.

The plant is called qat in Yemen, tschad in Ethiopia, and miraa in Kenya. Catha edulis: (kath'ă ed'yū-lis), A plant of Ethiopia and Arabia (family Celastraceae), cultivated for use as a stimulant; khat (the fresh leaves and twigs) is chewed or used in the preparation of a beverage; the active principle is pharmacologically related to the amphetamines, probably d- norisoephedrine.

[Ar. khat ]. C. edulis leaves, or khat leaves, have been used for a very long time, certainly for longer than coffee has been consumed as a beverage. It was most likely first consumed as a stimulant in Ethiopia, and was then spread by the Sufis and wandering dervishes, who ingested the leaves ritually.

They saw the consumption of khat leaves as a sacred activity through which one could come to .Khat (or qat) is a drug found in the leaves of a wild, East African shrub called Catha plan contains a central nervous system stimulant called cathinone.

Khat chewing is tied to social and cultural traditions dating back thousands of years, mostly in North-Eastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, where the plant is widely cultivated.Catha edulis f A taxonomic species within the family Celastraceae – khat, native to the Arabian peninsula and the Horn of Africa, known for the mild stimulant effect of chewing its leaves.

Hypernyms [ edit ].