Last edited by Nikokora
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Kalam Cosmological Argument found in the catalog.

The Kalam Cosmological Argument

by William Lane Craig

  • 341 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Wipf & Stock Publishers .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Christian Theology - Apologetics,
  • Ethics & Moral Philosophy,
  • Theology - Apologetics,
  • Christianity - Theology - Apologetics

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages224
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8755972M
    ISBN 10157910438X
    ISBN 109781579104382

    The Kalam Cosmological Argument for God book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Approximately years ago John Philoponus propo /5(4). I've dished out some critiques of William Lane Craig's Kalam Cosmological Argument (well he didn't make it up, but he's certainly popularized it) recently – here, and more recently today I thought of another angle to approach refuting this argument, and even though I don't want this to turn into Mike D's Official Kalam Criticism Blog, I thought it was worth sharing.

      I published the material on the Kalam version separately as a book, and this became more widely known. But the original doctoral thesis was an examination of all of the various versions of the cosmological argument. In my studied judgment, the one with the most plausible and perspicuously true premises is the Kalam argument. Abstract: This paper examines the Kalam Cosmological Argument, as expounded by William Lane Craig, insofar as it pertains to the premise that it is metaphysically impossible for .

      There is also a more detailed and in-depth presentation of this argument in Chapter 9 of Geisler’s much older book The Philosophy of Religion according to the Kalam Cosmological Argument. The kalam cosmological argument may be formulated as follows: Whatever begins to exist has a cause. The universe began to exist. Therefore, the universe has a cause.1; The starting point for Lane’s argument is that he believes the first premise is self-evident. Premise (1) seems obviously true—at the least, more so than its negation.


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The Kalam Cosmological Argument by William Lane Craig Download PDF EPUB FB2

Craig's book, "The Kalam Cosmological Argument", is essential reading for anyone interested in this controversial, but highly compelling, argument for the existence of God.

The book is divided into The Kalam Cosmological Argument book main sections: first, a history of the argument as detailed by philosophers especially in the Arabic world; and secondly, Craig's own Cited by:   The Kalām Cosmological Argument is a book by the philosopher William Lane Craig, in which the author offers a contemporary defense of the Kalām cosmological argument and argues for the existence of God, with an emphasis on the alleged metaphysical impossibility of an infinite regress of past events.

First, Craig argues that the universe began to exist, using two philosophical Cited by:   This book assesses some of the main forms of the Kalam cosmological argument. The author grapples with both medieval and contemporary interrogations of the argument with reference to Greek, Enlightenment and Medieval philosophers.

It gives the reader an insight into some of the main areas of controversy (for example discussions of infinity and /5(). Does God exist.

Of the many ongoing debates to answer this question, William Craig examines one of the most controversial proofs for the existence of God; the Kalam cosmological argument. Craig provides a broad assessment of the argument in lieu of recent developments in philosophy, mathematics, science and theology.

The book that reintroduced the Kalam Cosmological Argument to the philosophical and apologetic world. Excellent book - part of the math were beyond me so skipped some portions. The only complaint I have is that I would like to see this fully updated. This was published in and there have been numerous objections brought up to it.4/5.

Craig's book, "The Kalam Cosmological Argument", is essential reading for anyone interested in this controversial, but highly compelling, argument for the existence of God.

The book is divided into two main sections: first, a history of the argument as detailed by philosophers especially in the Arabic world; and The Kalam Cosmological Argument book, Craig's own /5(12). So I think that the first premise of the kalam cosmological argument is surely true.

Premise 2. The more controversial premise in the argument is premise 2, that the universe began to exist. This is by no means obvious. Let’s examine both philosophical arguments and scientific evidence in support of premise 2.

First Philosophical Argument. In recent years, the argument has gained a new face: that of Christian apologist William Lane Craig. He published a book named The Kalam Cosmological Argument in which caused al-Ghazali’s old ideas to resurface.

Admittedly, I have not read this book myself, so it’s not quite clear to me how it differs from al-Ghazali’s original. This book assesses some of the main forms of the Kalam cosmological argument.

The author grapples with both medieval and contemporary interrogations of the argument with reference to Greek, Enlightenment and Medieval philosophers. It gives the reader an insight into some of the main areas of controversy (for example discussions of infinity and Reviews: The Kalam Cosmological Argument: hing that begins to exist has a cause.

universe began to exist. ore, the universe has a cause. I The other philosophical argument o ered in defense of premise 2 is that there cannot be an actual in nite in the world, merely a potential in nite.

Hear special guest Dr. William Lane Craig walk us through the Kalam Cosmological Argument. Grab a copy of Dr.

Craig's new book "On Guard" to learn more about. The Kalām Cosmological Argument | William Lane Craig (auth.) | download | B–OK. Download books for free. Find books. The Kalam Cosmological Argument (KCA) is a different approach, proposed by Muslim philosophers in the Middle Ages. "Kalam" is a school of thought that tries to defend Islam intellectually against criticisms.

Famous Kalam scholars included Al-Kindi and Al-Ghazali - but they were largely ignored in the centuries, the KCA was an obscure argument, but in the 20th century it became popular. Of the many ongoing debates to answer this question, William Craig examines one of the most controversial proofs for the existence of God; the Kalam cosmological argument.

Craig provides a broad assessment of the argument in lieu of recent developments in philosophy, mathematics, science and. The original Kalam cosmological argument was developed by Islamic scholars in medieval times based on the Aristotelian “prime mover” idea.

It comprises two premises and one conclusion: Premise #1: Everything that has a beginning of its existence has a cause of its existence; Premise #2: The universe has a beginning of its existence; Therefore.

A survey of recent philosophical literature on the kalam cosmological argument reveals that arguments for the finitude of the past and, hence, the beginning of the universe remain robust.

Plantinga’s brief criticisms of Kant’s argument in his First Antinomy concerning time are shown not to be problematic for the kalam argument. This chapter addresses, one by one, the two premises of the. Countering William Lane Craig’s Kalam Cosmological Argument), I set out to succinctly list the issues I find in the three-line syllogism: Let me, for ease of reference, lay out my main points Author: Jonathan MS Pearce.

The Kalam cosmological argument was originally put forth by a twelfth-century medieval Muslim philosopher from Persia (modern day Iran) by the name of Abu Hamid Muhammad ibn Muhammad al-Ghazali.

Al-Ghazali was concerned by the influence of Greek philosophy (which maintained a beginningless Universe – one which flows necessarily out of God) on. The defender of the kalam argument may also advance other arguments attempting to show that the cause of the universe is God.

Although the argument fell into relatively obscurity after it was promoted in the Middle Ages, it received new life through William Lane Craig’s book The Kalam Cosmological Argument. Craig has become the argument. I am also well aware that the kalam argument is not an argument for a first material cause, but rather an argument for a first efficient cause.

(Notwithstanding the title of one of Craig’s articles on the kalam argument!) Nevertheless, I think the “intuitive” absurdity of making something “out of” nothing is a near neighbor of the. From Norman Geisler’s “The Big Book on Apologetics” “The Horizontal Form of Cosmological Argument” The cosmological argument is the argument from creation to a creator.

It argues a posteriori, from effect to cause, and is based on the principle of causality. This states that every event has a cause, or that everything that begins has.The Kaläm Cosmological Argument, Vol 1 & 2. Philosophical Arguments for the Finitude of the Past.

Editor(s): Paul Copan, William Lane Craig. Bloomsbury Studies in Material in Philosophy of Religion. New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic, November. pages. $This book develops a novel argument which combines the Kalam with the Thomistic Cosmological Argument.

It approaches an ongoing dispute concerning whether there is a First Cause of time from a radically new point of view, namely by demonstrating that there is such a First Cause without requiring the controversial arguments against concrete infinities and against traversing an actual infinite.